Category Archives: Miscellaneous

Hot Air Balloon Card

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I thought a hot air balloon would be a good choice for a farewell card. I’m not sure why; I’m sure most people don’t think of hot air balloons as a means of travel for people who are moving away or leaving a job. Perhaps a moving truck would have been a more appropriate choice for a card like this, but I think I like the balloon idea better.

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I based the design on a card I saw on Pinterest. I used a three layers for the balloon (and one for the basket). Repeating the pink layer on top gives the balloon quite a bit of depth. I like how it turned out, making the balloon look a little more three-dimensional. Using the fancy paper with the golden accents made the balloon look a little less cartoony, I believe. The clouds are made from some fibrous semi-translucent paper, which allows the background to come through a little bit.

Mother’s Day Flower Card

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The onset of spring and the increasingly sunny weather must be having an effect on Andrew and me, and the cards we make, because this marks the third post in a row dealing with flower-themed cards. With Mother’s Day approaching, Andrew and I knew we’d have to make some cards. Flowery cards.

Mother's Day Card

I first folded the card and cut a smaller panel which would eventually be glued onto the front. I embossed the panel and punched the corners (though I forgot to do this for some of the cards!). Using the floral designs I downloaded from Silhouette Studio—the ones I used in the previous post for the Cascading Card—I cut out some pretty flowers onto shimmery cardstock.

The flower pieces were held together with a brad. The brad also held the flower onto the panel. I spread out the two tines of the brad more than 180° so that they actually pushed back into the panel, preventing the flower from laying flat onto the paper, forcing it to stick out a bit more from the card. Only after I attached the flower to the panel did I glue it onto the base card, so that the brad’s tines wouldn’t show on the inside of the card. (This has been an issue with the Butterfly Cards we make.)

Pink Card with White Flower

I had to make one for my grandma, too. She loves the cards we make. I made her a 3-D Roses Card for her birthday a few months ago, and she has been searching for a shadow box to display it in. I have called my grandma Nini my entire life—it’s funny how of all the baby words we come up with, it’s the ones for our grandparents that tend to stick over the course of our lives, ultimately replacing their names—and so I had to put that on the front of the card. I thank her inside for being my Nini.

I’m really pleased with the color combos I used for my grandma’s card. I think the pink and purple complement each other well, and the green leaves are just the right shade.

Triple Flower Mother's Day Card

Andrew made his mom a Mother’s Day card that has three flowers! His mom thought he made it the day of Mother’s Day, but she was shocked to learn that it had been made two days earlier.

Collection of Mother's Day Cards

I brought in the cards above on the Friday before Mother’s Day for my coworkers to give to their mothers. One of my coworkers said his mom really liked the card he gave her. Yay!

I’m enjoying making cards with more dimension. Flat cards are nice, but it’s fun when they spring up from the card!

3-D Roses Card

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Last week was my grandma’s birthday, so I wanted to make her a card. My grandma likes floral things. Thinking back to some instructions I had seen for making paper roses, I decided to try making a 3-D flower card.

3-D Rose Card

Making paper roses is very simple, but it’s hard to get it perfect. (I didn’t get it perfect.) The link above has more detailed instructions, but pretty much all you have to do is cut a spiral out of paper, and then coil it up, starting from the outside and working your way in. If you use a one-sided print, as I did, you’ll probably want that side to be on the inside of the coil—but I don’t really recommend using a one-sided print, as the outsides of the flowers will be white.

Paper Rose Spirals

A 4″×4″ square of paper will give you a flower about an inch in radius, depending on how thick your spiral is. Getting the flowers to actually stay curled up is a little tricky. I’m sure there’s a better way to do this, but what I did was squirt a drop of glue into the center of the coiled-up rose and hold it together until it dried.

3-D Rose Card Angled

The leaves were fun to make, and I was thrilled with how they turned out. This was very simple: I cut out the basic leaf shape and then folded it in half, lengthwise. Then I did an accordion fold along the length of the leaf; unfolding everything gives you the leaves you see pictured! The stems are simply a long rectangle with a crease running down the middle.

My grandma appreciated the birthday card and she said she wanted to frame it!

Onesie Baby Shower Card

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With a coworker of mine about to begin her maternity leave, my coworkers and I discussed what we should get her. The consensus was to get her a gift card; however, one of my coworkers said we should also get her a Cardsies card! So of course, I was delighted to make my coworker a card.

Onesie Baby Shower Card

The design of the card is based largely on the onesies banner I made for a baby shower last month. Even the font is the same. The expectant mother told me that the baby would be a boy, but she was planning to keep the name of the baby a secret. So I was forced to go with the clichéd message “It’s a Boy!” It’s a good thing I knew at least the sex of the baby, or else I might have had to go with the vague message “It’s a Baby!”

Tiny clothespins at the top attach a short length of yarn to the card. The expectant mother could perhaps hang this card up in the baby’s nursery if she wanted to.

Onesies Card Back Pocket

On the back of the card is a flap which I attached at the bottom securely with glue. The top corners of the flap were attached with removable Glue Dots, which I also used to attach the gift card behind the flap. These removable Glue Dots keep them in place but make it easy to detach them. I used non-removable Glue Dots to attach buttons to the top of the flap.

I had my coworkers sign the card before it was finished, so at that point, the flap and the gift card hadn’t been glued onto the back, so the gag was a surprise for most of my coworkers. When I gave the card to my coworker, she read it and said it was very nice of us all to sign this card for her. Another coworker asked where the gift card was, and I asked if she had checked the back. There was laughter as she opened up the back of the card and found the gift card inside.

I think that gift cards (or money) can make great gifts, as they allow the recipient a lot of flexibility in how they use it. However, I’ve always felt it’s kinda tacky to just toss a gift card or cash into a card, as they can become the center of attention and distract the recipient from any sentiment written inside. Or they can fall out. So I love it when I can find a cute way to incorporate a gift card into the design of the greeting card like I did with the onesie card.

Get Well Soon Flower

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Two years ago, Andrew developed a little cough that just wouldn’t go away. So I made him a simple little get well soon card to make him feel better.

Get Well Soon Flower Card

I drew a little happy face on the flower. I traced my thumb to make the petals. The stem and leaves are made out of my favorite green paper. And I used some funky-edged scissors for the edges of the brown rectangle.

This design can be used for a variety of events: I made a very similar card for my cousin when she had her baby the following year. It’s a simple card but it’s very cheerful.

Nine Hearts

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This card features an array of hearts enclosed within squares with bubbly edges. Andrew and I had a difficult time deciding what kind of paper to use for each heart—we thought about having the hearts in the four corners be a different color—but we decided to have them all be the same.

Andrew and I made this as an anniversary card for my aunt and uncle. We used my die-cutter to design and cut out the shapes. The pink background and the pink heart in the center are extra sparkly paper.

Sorry To See You “Leaf”!

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With the knowledge that a coworker of mine would be leaving the company, I decided to make him a farewell card for everyone to sign. Well, actually, Andrew and I already had a small stack of extra Branches and Leaves cards, and I had the idea of giving my coworker this card, adding a terribly obvious pun: “We’re sorry to see you LEAF!”

A card with branches and leaves. A terrible pun for a departing coworker.

It was the end of November, so this was still an appropriate time to give this card. However, there was a catch with the Branches and Leaves cards we made: they didn’t open. I had a card with just a front and a back, with no inside. And I knew that this little card wouldn’t have enough room on the back for my coworkers to sign. So I had to innovate and push the theme a little bit further. People signed leaves.

That’s right. I used my die-cutter to cut out dozens of leaves from construction paper. I cut out twice as many as we’d need so that my coworkers could choose the leaves they liked the most.

A red envelope with a Velcro fastener.

Then, I made a dark red envelope for those leaves to be tucked into, and gave it a nice sturdy flap with a Velcro fastener. I cropped the original card a bit and glued it onto the front of the envelope, making the card itself into an envelope. (I tucked this itself into another envelope when presenting it, so it wound up being an envelope inside an envelope.)

When my coworker opened the envelope, and then opened up the card, leaves fell out of the card and onto the table. He was very amused.

A card with leaves spilling out of it

I enjoyed re-purposing a card into such a fun new design like this. It was fun to have a pile of leaves with people’s farewell wishes on them. I think this is the coolest, most innovative card I’ve designed yet, certainly the one I’m most proud of.